Discover your North Coast adventure

Carrick-a-rede
Carrick-a-rede rope bridge
Test your mettle on the fisherman’s rope bridge at Carrick-a-rede. Enjoy a short coastal walk, offering spectacular views to this iconic bridge. First erected over 200 years ago by local fishermen to check their salmon nets, the Carrick-a-rede rope bridge, is now a top tourist attraction run by the National Trust.
Take in the stunning views on the walk and look out for basking sharks, dolphins and porpoises in the beautiful blue waters, 30 metres below the bridge. Seabirds abound on the island with razorbills, guillemots and kittiwakes to be seen. Spot Rathlin Island and Scotland in the distance. There are limited tours available for a rare glimpse inside the fisherman’s house on the island.
The Trust offers a range of hikes and walks for all ages and abilities around Carrick-a-rede, with a nearby Game of Thrones site to take in too!
Carrick-a-rede

Carrick-a-rede rope bridge

Test your mettle on the fisherman’s rope bridge at Carrick-a-rede. Enjoy a short coastal walk, offering spectacular views to this iconic bridge. First erected over 200 years ago by local fishermen to check their salmon nets, the Carrick-a-rede rope bridge, is now a top tourist attraction run by the National Trust.
Take in the stunning views on the walk and look out for basking sharks, dolphins and porpoises in the beautiful blue waters, 30 metres below the bridge. Seabirds abound on the island with razorbills, guillemots and kittiwakes to be seen. Spot Rathlin Island and Scotland in the distance. There are limited tours available for a rare glimpse inside the fisherman’s house on the island.
The Trust offers a range of hikes and walks for all ages and abilities around Carrick-a-rede, with a nearby Game of Thrones site to take in too!

The Giant’s Causeway

Visit the UNESCO World Heritage site at the Giant’s Causeway. Marvel at the hexagonal rock formation of the Giant’s Causeway, formed over 65 million years ago by a volcanic explosion. Or if you prefer the legendary version of events, you can sit in the Giant Wishing Chair and marvel at the Fionn MacCumhaill’s giant boot at Port Noffer. Both versions are brought to life at the visitors centre on site.

Legend of Fionn MacCumhaill

The story of the Giant’s Causeway begins with the legend of two Giants; Ireland’s Fionn MacCumhaill and Scotland’s Bennandonner. Fionn MacCumhaill’s strength was legendary. It is said he tore a lump of earth from the ground and hurled it after his enemies, forming the Isle of Man in the Irish sea and leaving behind Lough Neagh, in Antrim. Bennandonner poked fun at Fionn so he decided to walk to Scotland and fight him.
Fionn, worked for six days and nights to build the Giant’s Causeway over to Scotland to face Bennandonner, however, when he arrived he realised Bennandonner was much bigger than him.
He ran home and told his wife Oonagh, who placed Fionn in the baby’s cradle by the fire. She invited Bennandonner into her house for tea and told him Fionn was out herding the cows. When Bennandonner saw the size of the Giant’s baby, he decided to run back to Scotland and tore up the Causeway as he went.
The remains of the Giant’s Causeway on the Scottish side can be found on the island of Staffa in the Outer Hebrides.

The giant causeway
Legend of Fionn MacCumhaill
The giant causeway

The Giant’s Causeway

Visit the UNESCO World Heritage site at the Giant’s Causeway. Marvel at the hexagonal rock formation of the Giant’s Causeway, formed over 65 million years ago by a volcanic explosion. Or if you prefer the legendary version of events, you can sit in the Giant Wishing Chair and marvel at the Fionn MacCumhaill’s giant boot at Port Noffer. Both versions are brought to life at the visitors centre on site.

Legend of Fionn MacCumhaill

Legend of Fionn MacCumhaill

The story of the Giant’s Causeway begins with the legend of two Giants; Ireland’s Fionn MacCumhaill and Scotland’s Bennandonner. Fionn MacCumhaill’s strength was legendary. It is said he tore a lump of earth from the ground and hurled it after his enemies, forming the Isle of Man in the Irish sea and leaving behind Lough Neagh, in Antrim. Bennandonner poked fun at Fionn so he decided to walk to Scotland and fight him.
Fionn, worked for six days and nights to build the Giant’s Causeway over to Scotland to face Bennandonner, however, when he arrived he realised Bennandonner was much bigger than him.
He ran home and told his wife Oonagh, who placed Fionn in the baby’s cradle by the fire. She invited Bennandonner into her house for tea and told him Fionn was out herding the cows. When Bennandonner saw the size of the Giant’s baby, he decided to run back to Scotland and tore up the Causeway as he went.
The remains of the Giant’s Causeway on the Scottish side can be found on the island of Staffa in the Outer Hebrides.

bushmills
Bushmills Distillery
Visit the world’s oldest whiskey distillery at Bushmills. Bushmills distillery, located in the small village of Bushmills, has been producing the finest malt whiskey since 1608.
Visitors can tour the world-famous distillery and see first-hand how whiskey has been handcrafted on site for over 400 years. Each tour offers an opportunity to taste the finest Irish whiskey and learn the history and art of distilling whiskey. This is a must visit on the North Coast.
mussenden temple
Mussenden Temple
Mussenden Temple offers some of the most iconic and spectacular views of the north western coast. Located near Castlerock, the round temple is perched on a 120 foot cliff edge and is managed by the National Trust. Enjoy spectacular views of to the west of Downhill Strand, towards Magilligan Point and County Donegal. To the east lies Castlerock, Portrush, Portstewart and Fair Head.
Built in 1785 by Bishop of Derry Frederick Hervey as a tribute to the beauty of his cousin Frideswide Mussenden, he used it as his library, with a fire in the basement used to keep the books dry all year round. It is modelled on the Temple of Vesta in Italy. The inscription round the tower reads:

“Tis pleasant, safely to behold from shore
The troubled sailor, and hear the tempests roar.”
bushmills

Bushmills Distillery

Visit the world’s oldest whiskey distillery at Bushmills.
Bushmills distillery, located in the small village of Bushmills, has been producing the finest malt whiskey since 1608.
Visitors can tour the world-famous distillery and see first-hand how whiskey has been handcrafted on site for over 400 years. Each tour offers an opportunity to taste the finest Irish whiskey and learn the history and art of distilling whiskey. This is a must visit on the North Coast.

mussenden temple

Mussenden Temple

Mussenden Temple offers some of the most iconic and spectacular views of the north western coast. Located near Castlerock, the round temple is perched on a 120 foot cliff edge and is managed by the National Trust.
Enjoy spectacular views of to the west of Downhill Strand, towards Magilligan Point and County Donegal. To the east lies Castlerock, Portrush, Portstewart and Fair Head.
Built in 1785 by Bishop of Derry Frederick Hervey as a tribute to the beauty of his cousin Frideswide Mussenden, he used it as his library, with a fire in the basement used to keep the books dry all year round. It is modelled on the Temple of Vesta in Italy. The inscription round the tower reads:

“Tis pleasant, safely to behold from shore
The troubled sailor, and hear the tempests roar.”

Downhill Demense and
Hazlett House

Downhill demense, is the name given to the walled part of the estate owned by Frederick Hervey (1730-1803), who was the Bishop of Derry and Earl of Bristol.
Mussenden Temple, lies within the grounds of the demesne which offers a fantastic day out, exploring the ruins of the 18th century Downhill House and the grounds. There are walled gardens, gothic gates, bog gardens and amazing walks and trails to explore. There is also a purpose built Bishop’s play trail for children.
Take a trip back in time with a tour round one of Ulster’s oldest surviving houses. Hezlett House was built in 1691. The house belonged to the same family for over 200 years before passing to the National Trust in 1976. Explore each room and discover how family life was and how it has changed through the generations.

Downhill Demense and Hazlett House
Downhill Demense and Hazlett House

Downhill Demense and
Hazlett House

Downhill demense, is the name given to the walled part of the estate owned by Frederick Hervey (1730-1803), who was the Bishop of Derry and Earl of Bristol.
Mussenden Temple, lies within the grounds of the demesne which offers a fantastic day out, exploring the ruins of the 18th century Downhill House and the grounds. There are walled gardens, gothic gates, bog gardens and amazing walks and trails to explore. There is also a purpose built Bishop’s play trail for children.
Take a trip back in time with a tour round one of Ulster’s oldest surviving houses. Hezlett House was built in 1691. The house belonged to the same family for over 200 years before passing to the National Trust in 1976. Explore each room and discover how family life was and how it has changed through the generations.

dunluce castle
Dunluce Castle
Perched precariously on the cliff edge of North Antrim, the ancient ruins of Dunluce Castle have stood the tests of time for more than 500 years.
First built by the MacQuillan family in 1500’s, it was seized by the McDonnell’s in the 1550’s. Sorley Boy McDonnell, had made the castle his base while consolidating his territories in Ireland and Scotland.
In 1639, the second Earl of Antrim, and Sorley Boy’s grandson, was in residence when the kitchens of the castle fell into the sea, bringing kitchen staff with it. A small town had been built around the castle in 1608, and today visitors can see the remnants of the town and castle on site. You can also peer right down the cliff edge from the castle windows.
Visitors can learn all about the history of the castle on the free Dunluce Castle app.
game of thrones
Game of Thrones Tours
The Royal Court Hotel, Portrush is the ideal base for Game of Throne fans. Visitors can enjoy exploring the nearby iconic locations including Dunluce Castle, the Dark Hedges and Ballintoy Harbour. Visitors can explore the famous dark hedges, presented as the King’s road in the hit series or journey to Greyjoy’s Castle at the medieval ruins of Dunluce. The quaint Ballintoy Harbour is an idyllic spot, which is replicated in the series as the Pyke and Iron Islands. It was here, Theon Greyjoy sailed into seek an alliance between the Greyjoy’s and Rob Stark in season two of the hit HBO series. Nearby Ballintoy Beach was used for the funeral scene of Balon Greyjoy in season six and Larrybane was the set location for Renly Barethon’s camp.
dunluce castle

Dunluce Castle

Perched precariously on the cliff edge of North Antrim, the ancient ruins of Dunluce Castle have stood the tests of time for more than 500 years.
First built by the MacQuillan family in 1500’s, it was seized by the McDonnell’s in the 1550’s. Sorley Boy McDonnell, had made the castle his base while consolidating his territories in Ireland and Scotland.
In 1639, the second Earl of Antrim, and Sorley Boy’s grandson, was in residence when the kitchens of the castle fell into the sea, bringing kitchen staff with it. A small town had been built around the castle in 1608, and today visitors can see the remnants of the town and castle on site. You can also peer right down the cliff edge from the castle windows.
Visitors can learn all about the history of the castle on the free Dunluce Castle app.

game of thrones

Game of Thrones Tours

The Royal Court Hotel, Portrush is the ideal base for Game of Throne fans. Visitors can enjoy exploring the nearby iconic locations including Dunluce Castle, the Dark Hedges and Ballintoy Harbour. Visitors can explore the famous dark hedges, presented as the King’s road in the hit series or journey to Greyjoy’s Castle at the medieval ruins of Dunluce. The quaint Ballintoy Harbour is an idyllic spot, which is replicated in the series as the Pyke and Iron Islands. It was here, Theon Greyjoy sailed into seek an alliance between the Greyjoy’s and Rob Stark in season two of the hit HBO series. Nearby Ballintoy Beach was used for the funeral scene of Balon Greyjoy in season six and Larrybane was the set location for Renly Baratheon’s camp.

Shopping

Fancy a shopping spree? Take a short trip into Coleraine and tour the many department stores and shops. You can also take a stroll around the Saturday markets, located next to the town hall. With more than 50 food and artisan craft stalls, the regular outdoor market runs every second Saturday.
Or take a day trip on the one of the world’s most iconic railway journey’s to the city of Derry-Londonderry. Shop the many outlets in the Walled City or tour tits famous walls – all only 50 minutes by rail or car from the Royal Court Hotel, Portrush.

shopping in northern ireland
shopping in northern ireland

Shopping

Fancy a shopping spree? Take a short trip into Coleraine and tour the many department stores and shops. You can also take a stroll around the Saturday markets, located next to the town hall. With more than 50 food and artisan craft stalls, the regular outdoor market runs every second Saturday.
Or take a day trip on the one of the world’s most iconic railway journey’s to the city of Derry-Londonderry. Shop the many outlets in the Walled City or tour tits famous walls – all only 50 minutes by rail or car from the Royal Court Hotel, Portrush.

causeway coast
World’s Most Beautiful Railway
Journey
Comedy legend and travel writer Michael Palin hailed the short trip to Derry- Londonderry from Portrush as “one of the most beautiful rail journey’s in the world.” Soak up the magnificence of the North Coast in this mesmerising train journey which offers everything from expansive unspoilt beaches, great flocks of wildfowl and soaring cliffs.
This blissful trip is the perfect way to arrive in the historic city of Derry-Londonderry.
lighthouse
Rathlin Island
Rathlin Island, off the coast of Ballycastle, lies only six miles across the sea of Moyle and is accessible by ferry. It boasts a population of 140 people and is an excellent spot to view birds and wildlife – particularly puffins. There is a boat visitor centre close to the harbour and a real working lighthouse to explore. Puffin watching season runs from April to July with lots of other seabirds on the island. You can also spot the seals basking on Mill Bay beach. Take a bike trip round the island or visit the local seabird centre and spend some time in the shops and restaurants on the island.
causeway coast

World’s Most Beautiful
Railway Journey

Comedy legend and travel writer Michael Palin hailed the short trip to Derry-Londonderry from Portrush as “one of the most beautiful rail journey’s in the world.”
Soak up the magnificence of the North Coast in this mesmerising train journey which offers everything from expansive unspoilt beaches, great flocks of wildfowl and soaring cliffs.
This blissful trip is the perfect way to arrive in the historic city of Derry-Londonderry.

lighthouse

Rathlin Island

Rathlin Island, off the coast of Ballycastle, lies only six miles across the sea of Moyle and is accessible by ferry. It boasts a population of 140 people and is an excellent spot to view birds and wildlife – particularly puffins. There is a boat visitor centre close to the harbour and a real working lighthouse to explore.
Puffin watching season runs from April to July with lots of other seabirds on the island. You can also spot the seals basking on Mill Bay beach. Take a bike trip round the island or visit the local seabird centre and spend some time in the shops and restaurants on the island.

Surfing

Portrush is Northern Ireland’s surfing capital and Royal Court Hotel is a great base for surfers.
Want to learn? Then hop on-a-board at the Portrush’s surf schools, based at in the harbour, where all ages and levels are catered for.
There are nine well-surfed, brilliant beaches along the Causeway Coast and six of them are all close to Portrush.
Beaches recommended for surfers are: Portrush West Strand, East Strand, Whiterocks Beach, Portstewart Strand, the east end of Castlerock Beach and east of Portballintrae Beach.

people on the beach
people on the beach

Surfing

Portrush is Northern Ireland’s surfing capital and Royal Court Hotel is a great base for surfers.
Want to learn? Then hop on-a-board at the Portrush’s surf schools, based at in the harbour, where all ages and levels are catered for.
There are nine well-surfed, brilliant beaches along the Causeway Coast and six of them are all close to Portrush.
Beaches recommended for surfers are: Portrush West Strand, East Strand, Whiterocks Beach, Portstewart Strand, the east end of Castlerock Beach and east of Portballintrae Beach.h.

causeway coast
Beaches
The Causeway Coast boasts some of the world’s finest beaches. Whether the sun has its hat on or not, the beaches in and around the Portrush area offer miles and miles of golden sands for you and yours to enjoy and take in the soothing Atlantic air. The blue flag Portrush East and West strands offer great walks and opportunities for water sports. For more information, enquire at the hotel reception. Take some time to enjoy the miles of beautiful, clean sandy beaches and dunes surrounding the Royal Court Hotel at Portrush.
Family Fun
Family fun
Jump in to a host of family fun adventures on the North Coast. Catch your first wave with the help of Portrush’s surfing schools, enjoy relaxing boat trips from the harbour, go fishing, horse riding and much more. Explore the many caves at Whiterocks Beach, enjoy fun and frolics at the water park or experience exhilaration on the many rides at the amusement park. Check out the fun at the activity centre at Dunluce where there is adventurous entertainment or discover the Wishing Arch and Elephant Rock at the blue flag Curran beach.
causeway coast

Beaches

The Causeway Coast boasts some of the world’s finest beaches.
Whether the sun has its hat on or not, the beaches in and around the Portrush area offer miles and miles of golden sands for you and yours to enjoy and take in the soothing Atlantic air.
The blue flag Portrush East and West strands offer great walks and opportunities for water sports. For more information, enquire at the hotel reception. Take some time to enjoy the miles of beautiful, clean sandy beaches and dunes surrounding the Royal Court Hotel at Portrush.

Family Fun

Family fun

Jump in to a host of family fun adventures on the North Coast.
Catch your first wave with the help of Portrush’s surfing schools, enjoy relaxing boat trips from the harbour, go fishing, horse riding and much more. Explore the many caves at Whiterocks Beach, enjoy fun and frolics at the water park or experience exhilaration on the many
rides at the amusement park. Check out the fun at the activity centre at Dunluce where there is adventurous entertainment or discover the Wishing Arch and Elephant Rock at the blue flag Curran beach.

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